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Gone Fishin’ …item 3.. For A Florida Fishery, ‘Sustainable’ Success After Complex Process — Controversial Toothfish (7:35 PM MON FEBRUARY 11, 2013) …item 4.. Swimming with the sharks (Sunday, 04.21.13) …

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Some beautiful miami beach models images:

Gone Fishin’ …item 3.. For A Florida Fishery, ‘Sustainable’ Success After Complex Process — Controversial Toothfish (7:35 PM MON FEBRUARY 11, 2013) …item 4.. Swimming with the sharks (Sunday, 04.21.13) …
8230202744 5b5eab7cb8 Gone Fishin ...item 3.. For A Florida Fishery, Sustainable Success After Complex Process    Controversial Toothfish (7:35 PM MON FEBRUARY 11, 2013) ...item 4.. Swimming with the sharks (Sunday, 04.21.13) ...
Image by marsmet546
Getting Certified… Day Boat applied for MSC certification in 2010. In retrospect, they say they didn’t quite realize what they were getting into. The MSC does not certify fisheries itself; instead, a fishery that wants the label hires any one of roughly a dozen commercial auditing companies, which can cost up to 0,000 or more, to decide whether the fishery’s practices comply with the MSC standards.
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A ‘MONSTER’ great white shark measuring up to 6 metres long is prowling a popular beach after biting another great white almost in half.

… MONSTER SHARK
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…..item 1)…. youtube video … !!MONSTER SHARK BITES GREAT WHITE IN HALF!! … 1:40 minutes

www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn0kWWyGk3A

Uploaded on Oct 25, 2009

A ‘MONSTER’ great white shark measuring up to 6 metres long is prowling a popular beach after biting another great white almost in half.

Category
Pets & Animals

License
Standard YouTube License
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…..item 2)…. youtube video … !!KILLER WHALE VS GREAT WHITE SHARK!! … 3:26 minutes

SUPERFISH – California tourist boat …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SS6NjdGLVZs

Uploaded on Nov 28, 2009

No description available.

Category
Pets & Animals

License
Standard YouTube License
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…..item 3)…. For A Florida Fishery, ‘Sustainable’ Success After Complex Process … WHQR 91.3fm …

www.whqr.org … Radio with Vision…Listen and See. … Under The Label: Sustainable Seafood …

By DANIEL ZWERDLING

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 6:27 pm
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mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/shared/npr/styles/card_wi…

Dennis Roseman, left, and Jamie Manganello pull in a swordfish off the coast of Florida. The Day Boat Seafood company went through a complicated process to become certified as a sustainable fishery by the Marine Stewardship Council.

Credit Chip Litherland for NPR

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www.whqr.org/post/florida-fishery-sustainable-success-aft…

Part three of a three-part series.

The long, clunky-looking fishing boat pulls up to Day Boat Seafood’s dock near Fort Pierce, Fla., after 10 days out in the Atlantic. The crew lowers a thick rope into the hold, and begins hoisting 300-pound swordfish off their bed of ice and onto a slippery metal scale.

As the staff weighs them, a computer printer churns out packing slips signifying these fish are superior to more than 90 percent of the seafood caught around the world — at least, that’s what an international nonprofit organization would tell you. Every swordfish that Day Boat catches can carry a special label when it shows up at the supermarket that says "certified sustainable seafood."

The seal of approval comes from the Marine Stewardship Council, which has pledged to promote fisheries that protect the oceans, not plunder them. The MSC says its system has certified more than billion worth of seafood, representing at least 8 percent of the world’s annual seafood catch.

Many environmentalists say the MSC system is flawed because it has expanded too fast. They say the growing demand for sustainable-labeled seafood is pressuring the program to certify fisheries that don’t deserve it.

But just about everybody NPR talked to about Day Boat, including environmentalists and food industry executives alike, said that Day Boat’s story reflects the good that the MSC system can do.

The way Day Boat’s owners tell their story, they decided to go through the complicated process of getting certified mostly because of their major client, Whole Foods. Co-owners Howie Bubis and Scott Taylor began supplying the upscale chain soon after they founded their seafood company in 2006.

They say business was good. But executives at Whole Foods announced that they were going to buy as much seafood as possible with the MSC label. "We decided we wanted to keep them for a customer," says Bubis, "and in order for us to do that, we had to move into sustainable-type fishing." He and his partner hoped that MSC approval would give them a competitive edge — and Whole Foods might pay them more than fishing companies that didn’t have it.

— Getting Certified

Day Boat applied for MSC certification in 2010. In retrospect, they say they didn’t quite realize what they were getting into. The MSC does not certify fisheries itself; instead, a fishery that wants the label hires any one of roughly a dozen commercial auditing companies, which can cost up to 0,000 or more, to decide whether the fishery’s practices comply with the MSC standards.

Day Boat hired MRAG Americas, a firm that has consulted with a who’s who of governments and international organizations from the U.S. to New Zealand. Bob Trumble, a vice president at MRAG, says his first step was to assemble a team of four ocean specialists that included him. The MSC requires the auditors to score each fishery on a checklist of more than 30 items, designed to measure whether the fishery meets the MSC’s three main principles.

The principles are designed to ensure:

– that fishing companies do not overfish (that they do not deplete the population of seafood that they are aiming to catch)

– that fishing companies protect other kinds of life in the environment

– and that each fishery is run by good managers who keep track of the latest research and adjust their methods, when necessary, to minimize their impact.

Trumble says that when MRAG’s team evaluates a company, "we don’t do the research ourselves." In Day Boat’s case, they gathered all the studies they could find on swordfish off the Florida coast, by government and academic researchers. How fast do the swordfish reproduce? How have their numbers changed over the years? Of course, Trumble says, researchers can’t count every fish in the ocean — they can only take a snapshot and then use mathematical models to extrapolate.

MRAG’s auditors also pored through Day Boat’s fishing records to see how its practices compared with the rest of the industry. Day Boat’s owners say they assigned a staff member to work almost full time for two years, just to supply MRAG with information.

And Day Boat’s owners say there was something more they had to do. The MSC rules say, in effect, that when companies are applying to be certified, they have to listen and respond to anybody who objects — including other fishing companies and environmentalists.

— Learning To Compromise

Talking to environmentalists? Scott Taylor wasn’t too crazy about that part. "The environmentalists would prefer no fishing whatsoever," Taylor says. "That would be their first goal, that we would go away."

"That’s not true," laughs Shannon Arnold, who was then co-director of the Canada-based Ecology Action Centre. "I eat fish and I enjoy it."

But Ecology Action and several other environmental groups tried to block Day Boat’s application. They cited evidence that swordfish boats in Florida accidentally kill endangered turtles.

Taylor insisted that Day Boat’s crews didn’t kill turtles, but he agreed to negotiate with the environmental groups over the issue — a big step for a man who sometimes talks about environmentalists with a scornful tone. And he ended up promising to make changes.

Taylor promised, among other things, that his boats would use a different kind of hook that scientists say kills fewer turtles. He pledged that within five years of being certified, Day Boat would put observers or video cameras on all of their boats, so researchers can study exactly what the company’s crews catch on every fishing trip. Environmentalists have been pushing fishing companies for years to adopt that policy, usually in vain.

"We could either take the tact that we were not going to let them derail us from the way that we were going to operate," Taylor says, "or that we were going to reach across the aisle in a way that was uncommon and really unheard of."

— Praise For Day Boat

In December 2011, MRAG announced that Day Boat could receive the MSC certification. And now, some of the same environmentalists who tried to block the certification praise Day Boat’s owners.

"It is pretty rare to get someone from such a big industry" to compromise," says Arnold, of the Ecology Action Centre. "And I think it’s a breath of fresh air."

Arnold says despite her praise, she still doesn’t believe the MSC should call Day Boat’s fishing methods "sustainable." So far, she says, Day Boat’s owners have only promised to change their methods. "Day Boat should get certified only if and when they actually make those changes," Arnold says.

Still, she applauds the way Day Boat’s owners worked with their critics. "It wasn’t easy," says Arnold. "I think there was a year of some pretty contentious stuff that went on, and then they both decided, ‘Let’s try and work through this.’ And what came out at the other end has been much better for the animals on the water, that’s for sure."

Day Boat’s owners say the process cost more than 0,000 — at least half for the audit company and the rest for related expenses. "It’s occupied three years of our life," says Bubis. But he and his partner say the MSC label has been good for business: They have been selling their swordfish for 10 percent more than competitors who don’t have it.

— A ‘Misleading’ Label

Environmentalists say if you just heard Day Boat’s story, you might conclude that the MSC is a great system. But they argue that it’s deeply flawed. They say for every fishery like Day Boat, they can point to another certified fishery with major problems. So the sustainable label "is misleading," says Gerry Leape, who helps run oceans programs at the Pew Environment Group.

"The consumer looks at the fish, and says, ‘Oh, it has the label on it, it must be sustainable,’ " Leape says. But "in some fisheries that the MSC has certified, that’s not necessarily the case."

Leape says swordfish are a perfect example. The fillets labeled "certified sustainable" at the local supermarket might come from Day Boat in Florida, which environmentalists applaud. Or they might come from long-line boats in Canada, more than 2,000 miles away. The MSC has labeled those Canadian swordfish sustainable, even though many environmental groups denounce the fishery because evidence suggests its boats accidentally catch tens of thousands of sharks every year.

MSC’s chief executive, Rupert Howes, staunchly defends their program. "The MSC standard is rigorous, it’s science-based, and assessment is based on the evidence," he says. "The beauty of the MSC program is every year, that fishery has to have an annual surveillance audit," Howes says. "Those numbers are checked again. If new stock assessment data suggests the population can’t withstand that pressure, new conditions can be invoked, or indeed certificates can be withdrawn."

But many scientists and environmentalists charge that in some fisheries, there is not enough data to conclude that they’re sustainable.

Consider the buttery white fillets popularly known as Chilean sea bass. That’s the usual supermarket and restaurant term for a deep-water species called toothfish, some of which are caught in the Ross Sea near Antarctica. When the MSC gave its seal of approval in 2010 to several companies that catch those fish, dozens of scientists protested.

"They do not know the most elementary things about the life cycle of this Antarctic toothfish," says Jim Barnes, director of the Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition, which represents dozens of environmental groups around the world. "Nobody has ever seen toothfish eggs," Barnes says. "Nobody has ever seen little baby toothfish, for that matter. And in the face of that gap, the MSC is cheerfully ready to say, ‘Oh, what this fishery is doing is perfectly sustainable.’ "

Critics say MSC’s apparent inconsistencies stem partly from the way MSC executives have structured the system: Each fishery that wants the label has to pay a commercial auditing firm to decide whether it is sustainable, just as Day Boat hired MRAG. Sources who have worked with several audit firms, including Intertek Moody Marine, Scientific Certification Systems and Food Certification International, told NPR that the industry is fiercely competitive. There are only around a dozen auditing companies vying to get contracts to certify fisheries around the globe.

"To me, that’s a direct conflict of interest," says Barnes. "What incentive does the certifying [company] have to say no?" Barnes asks. "It has no interest in doing that," he says, because then the company might scare away business from other fisheries that want the MSC’s sustainable label.

Since the MSC was set up in 1997, the audit firms have certified about 200 fisheries as sustainable and rejected fewer than 10 fisheries that applied. There are now 189 certified fisheries globally.

— Controversial Toothfish

Take a closer look at the controversy swirling around the Ross Sea toothfish. After the Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition protested, the MSC hired a respected international lawyer, Michael Lodge, to serve as a kind of referee. The MSC provides "adjudicators," as it calls them, whenever groups formally object. The process can cost tens of thousands of dollars. There have been 21 objection filings since the MSC was created.

Lodge’s report sharply criticized the audit company that certified toothfish, Intertek Moody Marine, for some of the ways it handled the case. The "conclusion reached by [Moody's] assessment team is not supported by the evidence," Lodge wrote in one section. Part of Moody’s evaluation, Lodge wrote, "can be described as arbitrary or unreasonable in the sense that no reasonable certification body" could have reached the conclusion Moody did "on the evidence before it."

"There are instances in the toothfish case when [Moody] had not been sufficiently rigorous, sufficiently careful," Lodge later told NPR. "You can call that sloppy. Certainly in those instances they were not doing their job properly," he says. "[Moody] failed to do what they were required to do as a certification body."

Moody’s general manager, Paul Knapman, rejects the notion that his company’s work has ever been "sloppy." Moody has certified more fisheries than any other company, according to the MSC’s website. Moody gave the seal of approval to the controversial Canadian swordfish industry. "We have scientists on our team who look at the information that’s been gathered," Knapman says. "It’s all evidence-based. And if they say that the fishery meets the standard, then we are able to determine the fishery should be certified."

Knapman notes that despite Lodge’s criticism, the MSC gave Ross Sea toothfish the sustainable label. But under the MSC rules, adjudicators like Lodge have limited options. They are not allowed to reverse a certifying company’s decision even if they conclude, as Lodge did, that the company didn’t properly review all the evidence. The adjudicators can rule only that the company must re-evaluate the evidence and reconsider its original decision. That is what Lodge ordered Moody to do. Moody’s auditors reached the same conclusion as they did the first time and labeled the fishery sustainable.

The MSC’s Howes is nonplussed when he hears about controversies swirling around some of the fisheries. "Yes, there are controversial fisheries; there are bound to be," he says. "We have nearly 300 fisheries from pretty much every ocean in the world either assessed or under assessment. I’m confident in the MSC program and its assessment process. No system is perfect."

Environmental groups and others have filed 21 official objections since the MSC was created. So does that low number suggest that environmentalists endorse most MSC-labeled fisheries? Many environmentalists we talked to say no.

Barnes, Leape and others say that they have not filed many objections mainly because they do not have enough staff, money or time. Directors of Canada’s Ecology Action Centre, for example, say that fighting the decision to certify Canadian swordfish diverted them from working on other priorities, and soaked up "literally thousands of volunteer hours" of research.

"The outcome is almost the same as if we’d done nothing," says Susanna Fuller, co-director of marine programs at the Ecology Action Centre. So she and her colleagues have decided not to file any more objections with the MSC. Of course, the objections are not a burden only for environmental groups. They cost time and money for fishing companies and their audit firms, too.

— Conflicts Of Interest Among Certifiers?

A few years ago, leaders of the Pew Environment Group became so concerned about potential problems in the MSC system that they hired an outside lawyer to investigate. Attorney Stacey Marz’s confidential report for Pew, which NPR obtained, warned "there will always be suspicions about the independence of certifiers when they are paid by those they are assessing."

The attorney recommended that the MSC or other groups set up a central fund, which fisheries would pay when they apply to be certified. Then the fund’s overseers would decide which auditing firm should evaluate which fishery — preventing fishing company executives from handpicking and paying the firm that decides their fate.

Knapman, Moody’s general manager, dismisses concerns about potential conflicts of interest. He says Moody, which has certified more fisheries than any other audit company, hires different teams of independent experts to evaluate each fishery. "They are by and large academics who have their own reputations, are established in their field. Those individuals certainly are not thinking long term about repeat work. The focus is on the fishery. Ultimately it’s their reputation which is at stake."

Howes, MSC’s chief executive, says the system of allowing companies to choose and pay the auditing firms that evaluate them is "the way that our global market-based corporations operate." He notes that many corporations, in industries from banking to manufacturing, routinely choose and pay independent auditing firms to evaluate the way they do business.

The MSC has extensive "checks and balances to assure that the accreditor does do a thorough job," Howes says. "If an audit firm got a reputation for doing a bad job in its certifications," he adds, "I suspect they would lose an awful lot of business, very, very quickly."

Howes sees the growing criticism of the MSC as evidence that the system is working well. "This was a fantastic idea. We’ve learnt by doing."

He later continues: "Part of the success of the program is, we’re a broad church," he says. "We’re very involved with all of our stakeholders, and many of them are very critical of some of the assessments. Most of the people who criticize the program, I think, are completely committed to an organization like the MSC existing. They see us as part of the solution. But it is their role to keep testing us, to keep pushing us, whether it’s on the industry side or the NGO side, to get better at what we’re doing."

Researcher Barbara Van Woerkom contributed to this story.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit www.npr.org/.
RELATED PROGRAM:
All Things Considered from NPR

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…..item 4)…. Swimming with the sharks …

… The Miami Herald … www.miamiherald.com/

The Miami Herald > Living > Travel > Latin American & Caribbean Travel

THE BAHAMAS

BY SUSAN COCKING
SCOCKING@MIAMIHERALD.COM

www.miamiherald.com/2013/04/21/3349431/swimming-with-the-…

BIMINI — Hovering in an underwater cage beside the fish-cleaning dock at Bimini Big Game Club, I watched with fascination the reactions of various species of marine life to scraps being tossed into the water.

There were the round bellies and webbed feet of a half-dozen pelicans trying to catch the carcasses in mid-air. There were schools of grunts and gray snapper attacking the sunken offerings with frenzied ferocity. There was a large Southern stingray that somehow got past the fish fury to the bottom, covering its haul protectively with its circular body.

And then … the stars of the show: three large female bull sharks, all trailed by multiple remoras, leisurely circling the cage from about 10 feet away and occasionally inhaling a scrap missed by their smaller cohorts.

It never occurred to me to be frightened. Breathing calmly from a surface-supplied air hose called a hookah and wearing a dive mask, I lounged around, neutrally buoyant, in a 10-foot-tall, 5-foot-wide enclosure made of thick-gauge aluminum as huge sharks cruised right by me. Heck, I could stay down here all day — except that other guests of the resort were waiting their turn to see large ocean predators in their natural environment.

I am one of about 100 visitors to experience Bimini Bull Run — the small island chain’s latest eco-attraction, which opened about a month ago. For 0, anyone — scuba certified or not — can take the shallow plunge and see sharks up close in the wild without fear.

“We’re going to bring this species home to a lot of people,” said Patric Douglas of Los Angeles — whose firm, Dock Sharks, developed the attraction.

Dock Sharks is known for creating cage dives at the shallow Tiger Beach site off Grand Bahama Island and at Isla Guadalupe in the Mexican Pacific, where great whites congregate. The company was invited to Bimini by Michael Weber, general manager of the Big Game Club, who had cage-dived with the great whites off Guadalupe several years ago.

“This past summer, we were throwing fish in the water and one day, we had 13 sharks there. A crowd gathered,” Weber said. “So it popped into my head we have a new attraction. I knew Patric and his team had the experience because they’ve been doing this all over the world. We put it together and magic happened.”

Kids as young as 8 have dropped in on Bull Run, enjoying it so much that they have named individual sharks — like Bummer, a large female with a hook trailing from her jaw.

“Part of it for us is education,” Weber said. “There’s a negative stereotype of sharks. They are magnificent creatures and part of the ecosystem.”

Well before launching Bull Run, the Big Game Club volunteered to become a “Shark-Free Marina” — part of an international conservation initiative to discourage anglers from bringing in dead sharks. Harvesting sharks has been illegal in the Bahamas for the past couple of years.

“They are perfect predators — not terrible monsters,” Douglas said.

Sharks have been gathering around the fish-cleaning tables on the south dock of the Big Game Club for decades. That’s how the location for Bull Run was selected.

Besides drawing tourists, Douglas said, Bull Run is a good underwater location for shooting film and television documentaries. It could also serve as a platform for scientific studies of a somewhat mysterious apex predator, the bull shark.

Bulls are among the least understood shark species. Growing up to 9 feet and weighing more than 400 pounds, they are often blamed for attacks on humans. Common to Florida and the Bahamas, they are one of a few species that can live for long periods in fresh water. Their reproductive processes and migration patterns are not well known. Several scientific research organizations are currently conducting tagging studies.

All of the dozen or so “residents” identified by distinguishing marks at Bull Run are females, and one of them may be pregnant. No males have shown up so far. How long they’ll stay around remains to be seen.

Meanwhile, the cage is open for business.
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READ MORE LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN TRAVEL STORIES FROM THE MIAMI HERALD

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February 19, 2014 |

Nice South Beach photos

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Check out these south beach images:

South Beach
10092368825 1eae0e3347 Nice South Beach photos
Image by Phillip Pessar
Vivitar 700 110 camera and cross procesed Lomo Peacock 200 Slide Film.

February 18, 2014 |

Nice Miami Beach Restaurants photos

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A few sexy Miami Beach restaurants images I found:

Barton G. The Restaurant – Interior
4161871291 edd8068601 Nice Miami Beach Restaurants photos
Image by ZagatBuzz
The flashy Barton G. The Restaurant serves generous portions of New American cuisine in South Beach.

February 17, 2014 |

Villaggio

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Check out these Miami beach images:

Villaggio
159162784 b6df50559a Villaggio
Image by WaveBreaker
South Beach, Miami Beach, Monday afternoon. Again, me want retirement now.

Where Italians go for Italian Take 1| 110507-0058-jikatu
5699537267 cb7cacc210 Villaggio
Image by jikatu
Hosteria Romana
429 Espanola Way, South Beach, Miami Beach, Florida.

Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Lens: EF24-70mm f/2.8L USM
Focal Length: 24 mm
Exposure: ¹⁄₆₀ sec at f/2.8
ISO: 1600

February 17, 2014 |

Miami’s Finest

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Some beautiful miami Beach music images:

Miami’s Finest
4470146378 bdeb4da516 Miamis Finest
Image by adamjackson1984
Coming in to Save Someone

Miami’s Finest
4469366221 b7150921cd Miamis Finest
Image by adamjackson1984
Coming in to Save Someone

February 16, 2014 |

12-12 Airplane picture from Miami to Providence – 14

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Check out these Miami beach images:

12-12 Airplane picture from Miami to Providence – 14
6578932025 556563bc3a 12 12 Airplane picture from Miami to Providence   14
Image by gus_estrella
Miami Beach as seen from plane taking off Maimi airport

Shot at ISO 400, Aperture of 8.0, Shutter speed of 1/1100 and Focal Length of 23.0 mm
Processed by Aperture 3.2.2 on Wednesday January-18-2012 11:52 EST AM

12-12 Airplane picture from Miami to Providence – 11
6578929211 027004d833 12 12 Airplane picture from Miami to Providence   14
Image by gus_estrella
Miami Beach as seen from plane taking off Maimi airport

Shot at ISO 400, Aperture of 8.0, Shutter speed of 1/950 and Focal Length of 23.0 mm
Processed by Aperture 3.2.2 on Wednesday January-18-2012 11:51 EST AM

February 15, 2014 |

Tomaree NP

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A few sexy south beach models images I found:

Tomaree NP
3063397498 195752dd62 Tomaree NP
Image by yewenyi
My second photo nude photo shoot.

February 14, 2014 |

Cool Miami Beach Restaurants images

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A few sexy Miami Beach restaurants images I found:

La Sandwicherie – South Beach
6591874741 17651dae42 Cool Miami Beach Restaurants images
Image by miamism

February 14, 2014 |

Cool Miami Beach Party images

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Check out these miami beach party images:

p3807
2396837126 eb00a89c2d Cool Miami Beach Party images
Image by YellowArrow
By tocleo
Location: Sagamore Hotel Art Party, Miami+Beach, FL (US)

TXT: hmmm.. what does it all mean, basel.

February 13, 2014 |

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10

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Some beautiful south beach party images:

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4498443199 6122a53cba Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4499075884 ccc9f06198 Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4499076566 e36b9acce6 Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

February 12, 2014 |

Nice Miami Beach Restaurants photos

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Some beautiful Miami Beach restaurants images:

2011 South Beach Wine & Food Festival: Chef David Myers with Other Guests at The Cosmopolitan Party
5492393665 071c81f054 Nice Miami Beach Restaurants photos
Image by The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
The Cosmopolitan South Beach Wine & Food Festival party Saturday night, February 26, 2011. Chef David Myers (far left) of Comme Ça.

The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas team hit South Beach, FL for the 2011 South Beach Wine & Food Festival. Festival goers had a chance to visit The Cosmopolitan "Slice" to get a glimpse of what awaits them in Las Vegas.

For more information or to book a room, visit: www.cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Find The Cosmopolitan on…
Twitter: @Cosmopolitan_LV
Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheCosmopolitan
YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/TheCosmopolitanLV

Red Mojito at Red Steakhouse South Beach
7903268064 166bd71a3c Nice Miami Beach Restaurants photos
Image by miamism
With Flor de Caña Rum and pomegranate

February 11, 2014 |

Nice South Beach Models photos

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A few sexy south beach models images I found:

Colorful Hispanic Kids. One of 18 scenes from today’s 16 June, 2012 Pismo, CA The Classic at Pismo Beach Car Show
7382543290 f67493194c Nice South Beach Models photos
Image by mikebaird
Colorful Hispanic Kids. — One of 18 scenes from today’s 16 June, 2012 Pismo, CA The Classic at Pismo Beach Car Show

thepismobeachclassic.com/ says
“27th Annual Classic at Pismo Beach – June 15 – 17, 2012: Call Today For More Information – (866) 450-7469The Classic at Pismo Beach Car Show is now approaching itʼs 27th year and has continued to grow strong since the early 80ʼs. The show is located in the beautiful downtown area and the on the pier on the Central Coast in beautiful Pismo Beach, CA. Each year Just Cruzinʼ Productions continues the tradition of one of the largest car shows in California. The Classic show is one of the most well known and well respected shows in the nation. It is one of the largest shows in one of the most breathtaking landscapes in the world. The Classic brings in approximately 175,000 spectators to the small town each year and over 1,000 show vehicles. Everyone is welcome and the event is FREE to the public! The show happens Fatherʼs Day weekend each year and the dates for 2012 are June 15 – 17.”

June 16, 2012 6:30 AM. 14 attended. Pismo Car Show – Photographing Classic Cars!
Light Photographic Workshops Meetup “The California Central Coast Photography Meetup”
www.meetup.com/LIGHT-Photographic-Workshops/events/62558832/ said
“Meet at the South East corning of Dolliver and Pomeroy.The Classic at Pismo Beach Car Show is now approaching itʼs 27th year and has continued to grow strong since the early 80ʼs. The show is located in the beautiful downtown area and the on the pier on the Central Coast in beautiful Pismo Beach, CA. Each year Just Cruzinʼ Productions continues the tradition of one of the largest car shows in California. The Classic show is one of the most well known and well respected shows in the nation. It is one of the largest shows in one of the most breathtaking landscapes in the world. The Classic brings in approximately 175,000 spectators to the small town each year and over 1,000 show vehicles. Everyone is welcome and the event is FREE to the public! The show happens Fatherʼs Day weekend each year and the dates for 2012 are June 15 – 17. This show is open to all makes, models and years of cars.We will meet on Saturday morning to photograph the set up of the cars as well as during the show hours. It is good to get there early so that you don’t have to worry about the reflections of the crowds and more of the entire car of your choice. Once the crowds start to build we like to photograph a bit closer to the cars and get parts.We would like to meet as a group first to go through a few tips and safety items before going in for photography. The leaders, Bob and Kevin have been photographing car shows for a long time and know a few things that car owners would appreciate you knowing before getting started.We will start walking about 10 minutes after we meet so try to get there on time!”

Photo © 2012 “Mike” Michael L. Baird, mike {at] mikebaird d o t com, flickr.bairdphotos.com, Canon 5D Mark III, with a Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM Telephoto Zoom Lens, with no circular polarizer, handheld, shooting RAW, Lightly developed in Lightroom 4. See EXIF for photo-specific exposure settings.

To use this photo, see access, attribution, and commenting recommendations at www.flickr.com/people/mikebaird/#credit – Please add comments/notes/tags to add to or correct information, identification, etc. Please, no comments or invites with badges, images, multiple invites, award levels, flashing icons, or award/post rules. Critique invited.

February 11, 2014 |

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10

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A few sexy miami beach party images I found:

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4499076058 cd3e2156ba Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4499081282 4ac3dd84b6 Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4498442143 86cf98893b Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

February 10, 2014 |

Cool South Beach images

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A few sexy south beach images I found:

South Beach
10092335314 714a2c514d Cool South Beach images
Image by Phillip Pessar
Vivitar 700 110 camera and cross procesed Lomo Peacock 200 Slide Film.

Buick On South Beach
5143262084 2b46fb8bf3 Cool South Beach images
Image by Phillip Pessar
These photos I took with Kodak Disc film came out much better than the ones I took a few months ago. This film, which expired in 1994 , was about 9 years newer than the film I used with my previous effort. I used a Kodak 3600 Disc Camera.

February 9, 2014 |

Nice Miami Beach Music photos

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Check out these miami Beach music images:

The Crowds at Ultra Music Festival
4470302590 771b432527 Nice Miami Beach Music photos
Image by adamjackson1984

South Beach Style, Plate 4
4781651364 0792e8a464 Nice Miami Beach Music photos
Image by Thomas Hawk

February 8, 2014 |

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10

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A few sexy south beach party images I found:

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4499076346 b2a49fb597 Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

Beatport Beach Party – 03.26.10
4499077784 e05a66db84 Beatport Beach Party   03.26.10
Image by Rohner Studio
www.SnappingHouse.com

February 7, 2014 |

Cool Miami Beach Restaurants images

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Some beautiful Miami Beach restaurants images:

CSI: Miami 311
3467626602 d746405487 Cool Miami Beach Restaurants images
Image by On Location in Los Angeles
From season 3 "Addiction".
A husband and wife are carjacked and she later ends up dead and her husband is wounded.
This is Fleming’s Restaurant on Douglas Street in El Segundo which is across the street from Raleigh Studios where CSI Miami is produced.

February 5, 2014 |

The End!

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Some beautiful miami beach models images:

The End!
3866007413 825a8869fa The End!
Image by Sam Antonio Photography
Leaving Miami behind!

Text and photo copyright by ©Sam Antonio Photography

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Sam’s Photography Blog
Sam’s Travel Photography Gallery
Sam’s Other Travel Photography Gallery

February 5, 2014 |

Miami Beach Palmen

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Some beautiful Miami beach images:

Miami Beach Palmen
7064991075 9f80d3271e Miami Beach Palmen
Image by Sebastian Fuss
Miami Beach Palmen

Miami Beach
5595882185 37e62ae616 Miami Beach Palmen
Image by charlie llewellin

February 4, 2014 |

DSCN1971

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DSCN1971

Check out these miami Beach music images:

DSCN1971
4477308193 e24b984bc6 DSCN1971
Image by XPI3 Beqy

DSCN1971
4477302005 97a07c592d DSCN1971
Image by XPI3 Beqy

DSCN0536
34538352 b7560100bf DSCN1971
Image by leef_smith

February 3, 2014 |
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